The things we’ll bring to space

Sergul Toh imagines what life will be like if we were banished to space in a post-pandemic world

The things we’ll bring to space

Sergul Toh imagines what life will be like if we were banished to space in a post-pandemic world

It’s post-COVID-19, and the battle against the coronavirus is finally over – but so is our life on Earth. Our planet can no longer tolerate us, much like how we feel about our GPAs. Mankind is headed to the cosmos to look for a new home. Luckily for us, we no longer have to pay an astronomical fee to get to space. SpaceX has finally launched its reusable rockets. A one-way ticket to Mars now costs just ten times more than a first-class air ticket, and comes with a 50 per cent chance of crash-landing on a hunky alien soldier.

As our rocket skims the atmosphere, we see not just billowing clouds in the sky, but also the gaping hole we left in it. We are surrounded by stars, but thankfully not the kind you want to be with at 9am on iNTU at the start of every semester. Oh, and we are finally able to conclude our meaningful debate with the Flat Earthers as well. For the final time, the world is not flat!

There are some things we must take with us as we head into the unknown – Princess Elsa would know.

The sentimental ones want to bring a piece of Earth with them as keepsake. Teo Wei Jie, a final-year electrical and electronic engineering student takes it quite literally – the meaningful thing that will fill the void in his heart is a rock from Bukit Batok. Nothing like a memory of Earth than an au naturel piece of it, he says. My sediments exactly.

For the foodies, there’s nothing like comfort food to keep them company in space. Yes, I’m talking about the ones who have guzzled instant noodles in lectures. Third-year communication student Yang Sheng Xiong plans to pack his favourite Krispy Kreme doughnuts and milkshakes, and make a business out of it in outer space. He even has a name for his new milkshake. No prizes for guessing what he’s naming it – “Milky Way”.

Third-year sociology student Foo Min Sheng prefers a different kind of creature comfort – he wants to bring his warm blanket, which will surely come in handy, since it is -273°C in space. For Zester Tay, a second-year business student, it would be his baby panda soft toy that he’d be clutching into weightlessness. Kudos to Zester – a real man is not afraid to admit that he has a soft side.

The pragmatic ones know that people are the best investment, and strategise who to pick as their space buddy. The business students know this best, especially during group projects. Third-year communication student Shanna Ng will have her grandmother by her side. She is confident her grammie, equipped with post-World War II experience, will be able to help her tide through post-pandemic living. The zero gravity may also prove to be very beneficial for her joints.

As we begin our new life in space, many important uncertainties remain. Will I get another semester of unlimited S/U options? Can I go on exchange to Pluto if it is not a planet? Will our favourite bee hoon delivery from Earth take off in space?

One thing’s for sure: school will definitely be an out-of-this-world experience.

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